Wisconsin Broadcasters Association

2017 Local Sales Success Webinar

June 16, 2016

ESA’s TOP 5 FOR 2017 Webinar
Wednesday, July 6, 2016
10:00 – 10:45 am CDT

ESA’s Top 5 for 2017 Webinar will outline a strategy of separation for you and your sales team. The focus will be on taking advantage of market movements and accelerating trends already in place in huge potential sectors … using smart, immediately applicable strategies and ESA’s ROI Method™.

YOU NEED A GROWTH STRATEGY FOR 2017 RIGHT NOW:

  • Top 5 Power Sectors in your market (and beyond).
  • 3 high-impact catalysts within each sector.
  • Opportunities & challenges market-leading entrepreneurs see right now.
  • Timely “odd-year” plan (no Political / Olympics).
  • Smart moves for your 2017 Growth Strategy starting today.

Your WBA, along with NASBA (the National Alliance of State Broadcasters Associations)  is proud to offer you this free webinar as a member service.

WEBINAR – New Overtime Pay Obligations

June 13, 2016

When Taking Care of Business Requires Working Overtime
Responding to the Department of Labor’s New Overtime Pay Obligations
A Guide for Broadcasters
Wednesday, June 22, 2016
1:00 – 2:15pm CDT

Speakers:

  • Scott R. Flick, Partner, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman
  • Rebecca Carr Rizzo, Counsel, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman
  • Moderator, Oscar Rodriguez, President, NASBA & Texas Association of Broadcasters

Your WBA, along with NASBA (the National Alliance of State Broadcasters Associations)  is proud to offer you a free Pillsbury webinar on the new overtime pay requirements for broadcasters under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

The National Alliance of State Broadcasters Associations invites Communications and Employment practice attorneys from Pillsbury to discuss what the new requirements will mean for broadcasters come December, and how these changes affect the existing exemption for certain employees at small market stations.

On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor published final regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) that more than doubled the minimum salary level necessary to be exempt from the Act’s overtime rules. While the changes affect all businesses subject to the FLSA, broadcasters in particular may feel the impact of the
changes given the staffing models used by many TV and radio stations. The new  requirements will go into effect on December 1, 2016, and broadcasters need to take steps to adapt to, and minimize the impact of, those changes prior to that deadline.

Channel Repacking Webex

June 8, 2016

Thursday, June 30, 2016 at 12:00 PM CDT
CHANNEL REPACK: We did it once, we can do it again!
Industry representatives from Wilkinson, Baker & Knauer, Dielectric, Comark/Hitachi, and Alive Telecommunications will make presentations.

We did it once, we can do it again! This time without that pesky simulcast period.

Following immediately on the heels of the Broadcast Incentive Auction, many of the auction losers, and non-participants will need to change channels.

The webinar will present a look at the project from the legal side, antenna, coverage and transmission options.  The meeting will be recorded and archived.

Summer EEO Webinar

June 6, 2016

Wednesday, June 15, 2016 at10:30 AM Central Time
Legal Issues And Effective Strategies To Prevent Unlawful Discrimination During The Employment Relationship
Presented by Rebeca M. López, Attorney
Godfrey & Kahn, S.C

-MORE-

Pillsbury Advisory: U.S. Department of Labor’s New Overtime Exemption Requirements

May 31, 2016

On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor published final regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) that more than double the minimum salary level necessary to be exempt from the Act’s overtime rules. While the changes affect all businesses subject to the FLSA, broadcasters in particular may feel the impact of the changes given the staffing models used by many TV and radio stations. The new requirements will go into effect on December 1, 2016, and broadcasters need to take steps to adapt to, and minimize the impact of, those changes prior to that deadline.

FREE MEMBER WEBINAR

May 20, 2016

Thursday, June 2 at 12pm
Online Public Files- Radio, You’re up Next!
Presented by David Oxenford, Wilkinson Barker Knauer

-MORE-

President’s Column

Michelle Vetterkind

Michelle Vetterkind

President Signs IPAWS Bill into Law
I’m thrilled to report that the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) was signed into law by President Obama on April 11. While broadcasters nationwide have worked for years to get IPAWS legislation passed, I’m proud to say that Wisconsin took a lead role in the 2015-2016 Congressional Session as Senator Johnson sponsored & shepherded the legislation last year in the Senate and Speaker Ryan recently played an instrumental role in helping to get it passed in the House. Those of you who joined us for the 2015 & 2016 DC Trips will certainly recall these conversations with both Senator Johnson and Speaker Ryan. If you’d like a copy of the bill, just let us know. If you haven’t done so already, please thank Senator Johnson & Speaker Ryan for their tremendous support!

WBA Helps Honor Paschke/McGlocklin
I had the honor of being asked to be a part of the celebration honoring Milwaukee Bucks Team Broadcasters Jim Paschke and Jon McGlocklin as they celebrated their 30th season together. The celebration took place at half-time of the March 17 game vs. Memphis. I presented Jim and Jon with plaques on behalf of the WBA and I was also able to hang out a bit with WBA Hall of Famer Eddie Doucette, who emceed the ceremony.

WBA Video Update Now Available 
With our newsletter (Wisconsin Broadcaster) now being offered bi-monthly, on the alternate months we’ll now be offering a brief video update. Questions, comments, concerns, just let me know.

WBA Summer Conference Festivities – Sign Up Now!
If you haven’t signed up, please do so now! I’m sure you’ll agree the Conference Committee did a wonderful job with the Agenda. Please join me in congratulating our 2016 WBA Hall of Fame Inductees (Lindsay Wood Davis, Aline Hazard, Larry McCarren, and Chuck Roth) and our Local Broadcast Legend Award Recipients (William Allen, Norb Aschom, Dick Kaner, and Bob Salm). I look forward to seeing you (and celebrating with you) in June at the Radisson Hotel and Convention Center in beautiful La Crosse!

FYI – the 2015 WBA Awards for Excellence Winners and Gala Highlights will be featured in the July/August issue of the Wisconsin Broadcaster (in the meantime, all winners—with video clips—can be found on WBA Showcase.).

Chair’s Column

Tom Allen

Tom Allen

Freedom

Many of us are familiar with the services provided by our WBA.

From webinars and the legal hotline, to job fairs and the winter and summer meetings, your association
provides a wide range of visible and helpful initiatives. But there are also quite a few activities important to our stations and our industry that go on behind the scenes. I’d like to take a moment to share the WBA’s involvement in a recent example.

As we all know, access to courts is central to our democracy. The First Amendment protects not only freedom of speech but also freedom to receive speech from willing speakers. An important role of the media is to be the eyes and ears for the public, so any attempt to prohibit access to sources and willing speakers must be highly scrutinized.

That’s why the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association recently joined a coalition of media organizations to fight a proposed gag order in a criminal case pending in Vilas County against prominent Northwoods real estate investors Brian and David Eliason. After filing charges against the Eliasons, the State moved to prevent the parties and their lawyers from speaking to the media.

The WBA was asked to join a group that ultimately comprised Gray Television Group, Inc., Journal Sentinel Inc., Lakeland Printing, Inc., Madison Newspapers Inc., Quincy Media, Inc., Rockfleet Broadcasting/Northland Television, Inc., USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin, and the Wisconsin Newspaper Association. The coalition was represented by Steve Mandell of Mandell Menkes, who was kind enough to allow me to share his “non-legalese” explanation of the case in this column.

The WBA’s executive committee voted unanimously to join the coalition. The decision to participate was easy. The proposed gag order would have stifled the flow of information about a high-profile case and would have hindered our members’ (and other media outlets’) ability to report on this matter. Plus, we were concerned about the long-term ramifications for other cases if the State were to successfully muzzle the trial participants in this case. We therefore joined the coalition.

The coalition filed the motion to intervene, and opposition to the gag order in early April. The court held a hearing on the matter on April 13, and we are happy to report that the coalition prevailed in court.

We opposed the request for a gag order on the grounds that it is an unconstitutional restraint on freedom of the press. Wisconsin recognizes a First Amendment right to gather the news, but there were no reported Wisconsin cases on the constitutionality of gag orders, which was another important reason to take this on.

The judge agreed with the coalition that there are other means by which the Court may ensure the defendants obtain a fair trial, without prohibiting or restricting the parties and their attorneys from communicating with the media.

For newsrooms all across Wisconsin, this was an extremely important issue. In this case, the media won. That said, we all know there will continue to be battles to fight across the state as we strive to keep our courts open, our records accessible, and our officials accountable. Rest assured that your WBA will continue to support those efforts.


Rethinking the news “product”

Kyle Geissler

Kyle Geissler, WBA Digital Consultant

I like to follow the words and writings of Jeff Jarvis, and not because I buy everything that he writes, but because I want to buy it.

His main thesis is that news organizations (he spends a lot of time writing about local TV news) needs to stop thinking about news as a product and think of it instead as a service to our audience.

This rings true to me, so I continually wait for him to explain what he thinks this means in terms of now newsrooms should actually be structured and run…and how it would better work to pay for news.

In a recent writing, Jarvis delivers a line that summarizes his ideas nicely:

Only when we reconceive of journalism as a service rather than as a factory that churns out a commodity we call content, only when we measure our value not by attention to what we make but instead by the positive impact we have in lives and communities, and only when we create business models that reward quality and value will we build that quality and value.

See what I mean? This is a great idea, but where’s the business model?

Still, as we think of the long term survival of digital news, I think Jarvis is promoting the correct paradigm.

Can you envision a future where broadcast journalism is funded by a model that rewards quality and value delivered to users, instead of pageviews?

Source: https://kylegeissler.wordpress.com/2016/06/26/rethinking-the-news-product/

Featured Video

WBA Video Update – June, 2016